Video stars now on the Internet, still female

Lady Gaga and Beyoncé; image courtesy of buzzworthy.mtv.com

Recently Logan Hill contributed a piece for Vulture on the invigoration of  music video production on the Internet following a dry spell for the medium on television. Of course, folks have noted this as YouTube, Vimeo, Vevo, and a host of other clip-sharing sites became ubiquitous alongside MTV’s continued programming choices to inundate their audience with reality shows. The network recently took “Music Television” out of its logo. For a moment, it seemed like DVD collections like Palm Pictures’ Directors Label series would step in and make music videos more available to the public, but clearly the Internet has won, even invigorating the careers of Spike Jonze and Michel Gondry.

While I don’t see this move as little more than a shift indicative of how we consume media, I would also like to point out that many of these headline-grabbing Internet sensation music videos are notable for another reason. The scandal and celebrity associated with these big-budget clips center on female pop stars. In the past year, Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Christina Aguilera, Miley Cyrus, Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, Shakira, Janelle Monáe, Erykah Badu, and M.I.A. have made garnered attention and controversy with clips inundated with sexual and/or violent imagery that might not fly on post-network television but keep the blogoshere typing, Tweeting, and uploading. Alongside those artists, fringe acts like Peaches, Yo! Majesty, and Gossip — all peopled by queer musicians — have garnered some recognition for their work.

Screen shot from music video for Rihanna's "Rude Boy"; image courtesy of accesshollywood.com

On the surface, the presence female pop stars have in reviving the music video format also recalls MTV’s nascence. Many note that the first clip the network aired was The Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star.” But Pat Benatar’s “You Better Run” followed it, along with a whole host of female pop stars who battled rock acts and hair metal bands for programming supremacy. The Go-Go’s, Cyndi Lauper, Tina Turner, Madonna, Janet Jackson, and Eurythmics’ lead singer Annie Lennox all catapulted to stardom during the network’s infancy, as art rock acts like Kate Bush also received some stateside recognition.

The Go-Gos' Rolling Stone cover; image courtesy of rhonabennett.wordpress.com

While the current stable of video stars seem to subvert conventional femininity by playing with camp and excess, I’m actually inclined to read many of these artists as ultimately normative. Many of the video narratives, regardless of costuming or cultural references, tend to rehash contrived narratives about young women getting rowdy in the club and letting her (hetero)sexual inhibitions run wild. I believe Badu’s “Window Seat” and M.I.A.’s “Born Free” challenge these offerings however, by either making female nudity at once mundane and endangered or by dispensing of the female pop star altogether to focus on government-sanctioned ultraviolence. Monáe’s approach might be the most refreshing as she recontextualizes rock and R&B’s cultural origins within a female body covered up in menswear that’s ready to teach you some new dance steps.

In addition, many of these musical artists are working with established male video directors. Gaga revived the career of Jonas Åkerlund, who originally made a name for himself working with Madonna. While it’s easy to read these directors as auteurs, I’m inclined to point out that some of them have established collaborative relationships with these women across several projects. This also recalls how Gondry came into the cultural lexicon. While we may now think of him as the visionary behind White Stripes videos and Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind, an Icelandic pop star named Björk selected him to direct his first English-language music video after years working in France. The clip was for “Human Behaviour,” which launched both of their careers in the states.

I’d like to bring up in the current emergence of female pop stars on the Internet is that almost all of them are solo artists taking sole focus on big-budget music videos. While I don’t want to suggest that these women are not musicians, or overlook the fact that Beyoncé tours with an all-female backing band, I find it disheartening that we aren’t seeing as many images of women and girls creating video images as collaborators, whether between female artists and directors, as members of a band, or female artists who collaborate with one another. While Lady Gaga and Beyoncé have been known to work together, as have M.I.A. and Santigold, it would be nice to see more music videos with a group of women or girls as the focus.

Sasha Fierce's backing band; image courtesy of spin.com

Likewise, I also find it frustrating that so many of these big productions have to be so moneyed, most notably Lady Gaga and Beyoncé’s “Telephone.” Perhaps a new group of bands and musical artists in collaboration with one another will also make names for themselves as music videos continue to thrive on the Internet. Who says you need a big budget and an iconic pop star to make a clip for the ages?

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7 comments

  1. MP:me

    Sorry, tried to leave the related url in the post via html, but didn’t take:
    aljean.wordpress.com/2010/05/25/im-kinda-busy
    Hope you’ll take a look at my recent post on Telephone’s gender morph!

    Alex

  2. onetenaciousbabymama

    Hi there…I’m new here just poking around, reading, nodding in recognition of some basic truths about the pop music world as it presently exists. I’ve been through a few different incarnations of these derivative ladies. I’m not sure if they even really deserve to have articles written about them they’re so not bringing anything new to the world’s mix. I’m glad you’re sharing your realizations, though. And thanks also for the pics and links back to the old school stuff. Love the Bjork video a lot.

    darkdaughta

    • Alyx Vesey

      Yeah, I kind of share your feelings of many of these folks not bringing anything new to the table. As a matter of fact, I think you can draw a pretty easy throughline between critical discussion of Gaga and the Internet in the present to scholarship on Madonna and MTV in the late 80s-mid 90s. The medium is different of course, but the applications are quite similar. Anyway, thank you for reading and if you keep poking around, I think you’ll find that I look at a lot of different types of contributions to music culture.

  3. onetenaciousbabymama

    I’d agree about that completely unbroken, unaltered line. What I found scary recently was X-tina, who doesn’t have one original bone in her body, but a really big voice, attempting to bite from Britney, Madonna and Gaga, all themselves photocopies, and doing it so shamelessly. Actually the name of her song is so damned ironic – “not myself tonight” – is so hilarious and totally right. She’s not herself. She’s a soulless derivative of Madonna, Gaga and Britney. Derivative of derivatives. hehehe. I’m enjoying reading your thoughts. So, I definitely will keep looking around, Alyx. Thanks for the welcome.

  4. Pingback: Lady Professor Sings the Blues « MEDIA PRAXIS

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