Category: Feminist Music Geeks Turn Their Headphones Up

Feminist Music Geek Presents… Extradiegetic

Episode 4 - Extradiegetic (Still of Chavela Vargas from Flower Of My Secret)

Here’s the “film music” episode of Feminist Music Geek Presents…, for your streaming pleasure. The photo is a screen grab from a scene in Pedro Almodóvar’s The Flower of My Secret, which includes a TV broadcast of a Chavela Vargas stage performance. The singer is one of the director’s muses, and I think that image nicely captures what this episode is going for in its exploration of original soundtrack material, soundtrack covers, and songs about women’s relationship to filmmaking and spectatorship. Also, while I didn’t officially associate the playlist with the UW-Cinematheque’s summer series (no calls to action), they do have a very cool program this season. I’ll see you later, Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

Some things.

1. Currently, I can only afford SoundCloud’s base membership of two free hours (summertime is a lean period for grad students). So, for now, I will only make two playlists available at a time. As a result, I had to temporarily delete the SPECTRUM playlist. However, I am keeping all of the original files and will make them available in the fall, when I can afford to pay for membership. I’ll keep y’all posted.

2. I tried to upload my third episode earlier this morning, but I was unable to post it to SoundCloud because it included ESG’s “UFO,” which violates the terms of the band’s copyright. While I actually based the ORIGINS playlist around this much-sampled single and the group’s frustration with unauthorized or appropriated usage of their material (i.e., Sample Credits Don’t Pay Our Bills), I respect ESG on this issue and will post an edited playlist next week with the track omitted. While I don’t want copyright law to determine how and when people listen to my show, this might be a good reminder for folks to tune in to WSUM on Fridays at 9 p.m.

3. In an effort to make the show more social media-friendly, Feminist Music Geek Presents… now has a hashtag. #fmgpresents 

4. Feminist Music Geek Presents… is now taking submissions. If you are a female-identified musician and would like to submit music to FMG Presents… for review, DM me and I’ll provide you with contact information.

Happy listening!

Feminist Music Geek Presents … Reinterpretations

Episode 2 - Reinterpretations (Jane Lane, Starry Night)

Episode two of my WSUM radio program is available on SoundCloud for your streaming pleasure. This is a covers set. I’d love to do another one, so send me some requests.

In other “Alyx on the Internet” news, earlier this week I wrote a tribute post to Casey Kasem for Antenna. Check it out!

Feminist Music Geek Presents … Spectrum

Leo Villareal - Big Bang

I returned to college radio late last month with my own show. Feminist Music Geek Presents… is currently in its third week. It honors women’s historical and contemporary musical contributions across genre. However, while I hope people are tuning in to WSUM on Friday nights at 9 p.m. to listen to the program, I wanted to give listeners the ability to stream my playlists afterwards. Here’s “Spectrum,” the first episode of FMG Presents… I’ll post a new episode each week.

Three things to note.

1. Each show focuses on a particular theme, which I explain at the beginning of the episode. Themes provide a useful organizational framework and allow me to put recording artists in dialogue with each other in a new context.

2. I’ll be excising WSUM-specific content (i.e., PSAs and underwriting) from the episodes, because community radio and digital streaming sites serve different entities.

3. As a result, I’ll limit my voice breaks to the introductions that frame the episodes so the music can be the focus. Hopefully, the set list serves as a sufficient guide.

I’m having a blast putting these sets together and I have lots of ideas for future episodes. If you want to make requests, recommendations, or suggestions, follow the blog on Facebook and Twitter. I’ll be on the air this summer on Friday nights from 9-10 p.m. (CST). Tune in, and make sure to check out the rest of WSUM’s fine music and community programming. Happy listening!

Collecting

In the first chapter to her book, The Promise of Happiness, Sara Ahmed makes the following argument about the meanings that we put into the things we own:

If we arrive at objects with an expectation of how we will be affected by them, this affects how they affect us, even in the moment they fail to live up to our expectations. Happiness is an expectation of what follows, where the expectation differentiates between things, whether or not they exist as objects in the present (29).

This makes a lot of sense to me. Records are my happy object.

Record Store Day 2014

Objects accumulate meanings because of the associations and feelings we bring to them. On last week’s Mad Men, an engineer helps install an IBM 360 in the middle of SC&P and explains computers’ dark thrall to Don Draper: “It’s been my experience these machines can be a metaphor for whatever’s on people’s minds.” Conveniently, recent Mad Men episodes have been framed by promos for AMC’s new period drama, Halt and Catch Fire, which details the development of a fictional Texas-based computer company in the early 1980s. In the clip, a character states: “Computers aren’t the thing; they’re the thing that gets us to the thing.”

Ahmed would love that sentence’s circularity. Also, you could replace “computers” with just about any other word and the sentiment would still hold. In Ahmed’s mind, the thing we’re trying to get to is happiness, which we never completely arrive at and often only recognize in retrospect. I was reading Ahmed’s book during Record Store Day, which my partner and I observe every year. As I thumbed through the crates, posted images of my findings, pored over the covers, filed away my vinyl, and threw on my newly purchased copy of the Life Without Buildings reissue, I thought about what expectations collectors put into records. Technologies are often thick with possibility. We may think that a new gadget or toy will be “it.” Instead, we frequently integrate some of their features into our daily lives (load it, check it, quick – rewrite it). We only notice their object-ness when they don’t work (buy it, use it, break it, fix it).

I’m literalizing Ahmed’s use of the word “object.” She uses the term to express how individuals orient themselves within culture. According to Ahmed, people can be objects as well. When they congregate, they often objectify one another. Ahmed argues that this results in children becoming distinctly burdened as symbols for hope. That could explain why the dinner table is a volatile place for some families. But we often symbolize people and risk turning them into our happy objects. It also explains why making a mix for someone always means more than putting a sequence of songs together. The mix is the thing that gets us to the thing.

There’s a curatorial function to record collecting, but it doesn’t mean anything without people. Building a collection implies a sense of discernment, which is learned from living in the world and absorbing social norms. This ascribes unequal value to objects, which we should always question. You may ask yourself if a piece of music “deserves” to be on vinyl and folded into your collection. You may also get rid of things because of unfortunate associations. How often do break-ups forever alter your relationship to music? How often is that association shame? “Happiness is an expectation of what follows,” indeed. Because of a boy, I started college with three Blink-182 albums in my CD collection (including the yellow version of Take Off Your Pants and Jacket, the one with “Fuck a Dog” on it). Other records—Björk’s Homogenic; PJ Harvey’s Stories From the City, Stories From the Sea; The Dismemberment Plan’s Change—remind me of that time, but they made it to the other side and accumulated new meanings for me. But when I was ready to let it go, Dude Ranch didn’t even make it to a used record store. I flung it into a parking lot. Part of it was me being spiteful; it was a gift. Part of it was me applying feminism to music snobbery; I was done with pop-punk dick jokes. Part of it was me being a music snob; at 19, pop-punk was my bad object. A big part of it was shame; I didn’t like who I was when I was with him.

Sharing and combining record collections is an act of faith. What if you hate your partner’s records? What if you lose things? What if you end up having to divide everything back up into boxes and go your separate ways? I’ve merged my record collection with another’s exactly once. The ease with which we did it eight years ago was a good sign. We’ve schlepped our records to three homes and two states, but the process never bothered me. When I look at our records, I like being able to see what was him before me (The Aquabats), what was me before him (Depeche Mode), what we don’t share as a couple, what we brought to each other, and what became us.

You’ll never have enough records. There’s a beautiful sadness to that fact when you’re a collector. I’ll never hear all of the necessary sounds in the world and I’ll never have enough shelves to house them in one place and that is very comforting. Of course, technological progress has radically changed our perception of ownership and storage. Digitization has made just about anything available through both legal and illegal means and we can place that stuff in increasingly smaller, light-weight, and ephemeral spaces. Toward the end of a long, uncertain semester, I started to scan all of the paper I accumulated during course work and teaching. I did this to achieve a sense of control. I may not know what shape my dissertation will take or what its impact will be. But I imagine being happier and more at ease once the stacks on my desk and floor disappear. However, new stacks will probably spill over in their place. Happy objects are messy.

What I’m talking about is gathering. In Queer Phenomenology, Ahmed waxes poetic about tables and returns to them briefly in The Promise of Happiness. According to Ahmed, the table is a writing surface, a technology that bears the traces of its use, a gathering space, and an item that recedes into the background until certain interactions cause its presence to intensify (2006). Her meditation on tables reminds me of how scholars like David Morley, Lynn Spigel, and Ann Gray have theorized the television and the political significance of individuals and families’ interactions with it in the home. It also made me think about when Mary Kearney described television as something you need to dust during a class activity in her feminist television criticism graduate seminar. I never looked at another television set without thinking about dust, and I think about what else accumulates in my home full of objects. Records gather meaning in dust and in scuff marks. We put them there.