Tagged: mix CDs

Why you should make a mixtape for Explode Into Colors

I’ve yet to visit Portland but know it by reputation. Many friends call it home, even if none of them currently claim it as residency. I’ve often taken the opportunity to razz them about their Pacific Northwestern biases, but I understand the affinity. As an Austin transplant, I’ve imagined Portland as this city’s wetter, more overcast fraternal twin. It’s the home to Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls and Bitch and boasts establishments like Powell’s Books, Food Fight!, and Voodoo Donut. Like Austin, it’s got an independent music scene nurtured by DIY enthusiasts. Pass me one of your microbrew dogs and I’ll twist open a Shiner for you. Let’s hang.

One Portland band that’s been on my radar since early last year is Explode Into Colors. I missed them during the last SXSW but am fully prepared to catch them this time.

As if their sound wasn’t enough, word circulated that they’ll be accepting mixtapes as cover for their upcoming Holocene gig. When they come to Austin for SXSW, I hope they’ll be taking other fans’ mixes as a good will gesture.

Explode Into Colors; image courtesy of holocene.org

I’m an ardent supporter and maker of mix CDs. I value them as an aural marker of someone’s history and treasure them as homemade gifts made and traded by friends. Each tracklist tells a story, as does the presence or absence of liner notes and album art. I believe my friend Kaleb of Karaoke Underground proposed the idea of a mix CD swap. I fully support this and would be happy to participate. Expect lots of cuts from Vince B.’s A Reference Of Female-Fronted Punk Rock: 1977-89 anthology, pulled directly from Kängnäve.

Tapes have been on people’s minds lately. Rob Sheffield used mixtapes to shape his autobiographical Love Is A Mix Tape. On 3o Rock, TGS star Tracy Jordan offered to make General Electric executive Jack Donaghy a Phil Collins mixtape as a token of their burgeoning friendship (Donaghy accepted because he has “two ears and a heart”). More recently, Simon Reynolds and Marc Hogan wrote some interesting essays outlining the wave of acts associated with glo-fi (or “chillwave” or “hypnagogic pop“) and the surge of upstart tape distros. With nostalgic fondness for “failed” technology and a desire to re-experience music as something less immediate and more holistic than an mp3 file, many people are returning (regressing?) to tapes. Perhaps Dennis Duffy was right. Technology is cyclical, at least for some.

I’m certainly intrigued by this deliberate move toward difficult and faulty antiquated technology. I’m also a bit of a cassette enthusiast. As a deejay, I recorded several of my shows on tape. It was around this time that I inherited my grandmother’s Mercury Grand Marquis, which I drove until it had to be traded in. As installing a CD player proved too costly, I often played my broadcasts in the car, along with holdovers from my youth, like The Pet Shop Boys’ Discography and The B-52s’ Cosmic Thing. I like that tapes forced me to listen to sequences rather than tracks. The tapes from my show are still in the glove compartment of my Mazda 626, waiting to be lodged into a tape deck.

I love most when a tape warps, changing the speed and sound of the recordings and making tracks at once familiar and foreign. Tapes may document a moment in time, but their vulnerability toward degradation makes them unreliable historians. To bend another 30 Rock character’s words, tapes (like Donaghy’s ceramic cookie jar collection) are alive. They change shape as they age. I hope Explode Into Colors keep the stacks of mixtapes they may be inheriting from their show at Holocene. Who knows what they’ll sound like or conjure up over time.

Devin, bassist for Crucifictorious

So, I’ve been devouring Friday Night Lights recently. I’ve got four episodes left of season three, so don’t tell me what awaits the Dillon Panthers and their surrounding small-town Texas community.

I was pleasantly surprised this weekend while watching season three. I didn’t realize that Crucifictorious, a Christian death metal band formed by Dillon High’s Landry Clarke, was getting a new female bass player named Devin Corrigan. A good female bassist who proved a needed asset to the band, no less.

Devin Corrigan; image courtesy of tvguide.com

As an aside, I have now rewatched the season two episodes where my friend Brea played brainy, metal-fan music geek Jean Binnel. Now that I’ve watched almost the entire series thus far and know its larger context, I can say 1) I really like Jean and think I’d be her friend, 2) I want her to make me a power pop metal mix CD, 3) I think her small part might have been one of the best things about a sporadically brilliant but uneven season plagued by network tampering and the writer’s strike, and 4) Landry did her wrong, even if I like the girl with whom he briefly reunited.

Sorry, couldnt resist posting a picture of music geek Jean Binnel; image courtesy of blogcdn.com

Sorry, couldn't resist posting a picture of music geek Jean Binnel; image courtesy of blogcdn.com

I was also stoked that Devin was played by Stephanie Hunt, a back-up singer in T-Bird and the Breaks.

And I thought it was rad that the girl who seemed to be a too-perfect rebound girl for the recently spurned lead singer was actually a newly out lesbian teenager, as she reveals in “Keeping Up Appearances.” While she does kiss Landry before coming out to him, she does so to make sure of her orientation, perhaps suggesting that Landry is the first person to whom she has come out. I was impressed by a) her confidence in identifying herself as a lesbian, as I don’t imagine too many girls I grew up with felt comfortable owning their identity like that at that age in our small Texas town and b) Landry’s maturity about the situation. The episode ended with the band jamming to The Flaming Lips’ “She Don’t Use Jelly,” which Devin sang to Landry earlier to help him with a broken heart.

The next episode for me is “The Giving Tree,” which seems to focus on Crucifictorious’s first gig with Devin. I’m hoping for a good turn-out. I’d be there. My only hope is that we see more of her, hopefully with a girlfriend to boot. I don’t know if she will be appearing in season four, which premieres on DirecTV this Wednesday, much less the rest of season three, but I like her.

Things I learned at GRCA: Session #2

Think of this post as an extension of this one. Only it’s different, because this is a new group of girls with upbringings, influences, opinions, and dispositions.

1. Let girls talk, even if they might potentially be disruptive. They might just want you to pay attention to them. Rather than tell them to be quiet and fret that they aren’t listening, try and engage them and talk to them. This might make them listen, especially to their own words and those of their peers. You, the instructor, may learn something as well by asking a girl to share with the group what she’s telling a friend in the corner and having that girl drop some science on the class.

2. Make sure to intervene when a girl says “you’ve never heard of _______?” to another girl. Try and spin it like, “well, not everyone can hear everybody.” Be honest about the things you didn’t know and learned from your friend Kristen when you put this workshop together. Condoning that behavior may make loud girls quiet and quiet girls unable to participate. Correcting that behavior gently may help them all to listen and share.

3. Don’t forget how important Selena continues to be for many girls.

4. Don’t take credit for putting Selena in the PowerPoint (good contribution, Kristen).

5. Allow yourself to get really amped when girls yell out names at images of bands and musicians they recognize and love.

6. Let yourself dance with the younger girls when they do the wave during the Gossip/Sharon Jones mini-dance party at the end of the workshop.

7. Remember how exciting it is when a girl tells you she learned about a musician from her mom.

8. Be kind and respectful when some girls let you see their band perform during rehearsal (thanks, ladies from Chucky’s Unknown Children).

9. Some girls might read your blog. Be humble and grateful when they tell you this and remember them as you try and make this space more inclusive.

10. Not all girls like the same things from session to session. Overall, these girls had little use for Björk or riot grrrl. However, they did seem to like The Runaways, Erykah Badu, and Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings.

11. Always highlight female musicians who play unconventional instruments. Don’t make a distinction between cool and uncool instruments. After all, X-Ray Spex’s Lora Logic played the saxophone.

12. Remember all the bands and artists you didn’t include that the girls mentioned in case you get to give this workshop next time.

13. Always make extra copies of the mix CD in case girls want to give a copy to a sibling/cousin/friend.